Prehospital Blood Pilot Program Proves Initial Success in Saving Lives

Prehospital Blood Pilot Program Proves Initial Success in Saving Lives

Approval for a pilot program in Georgia, USA
In the state of Georgia, only air medical helicopters staffed with a registered nurse and paramedic can initiate blood products in a prehospital setting. Paramedics on ambulances are not licensed for this work. However, weather and availability create barriers to air medical helicopters serving all hemorrhaging patients who might benefit from receiving blood products before arriving at the hospital. 

Delivering Georgia’s pilot program
RTAC region two includes 13 counties in the northeast Georgia corridor. The pilot program involves the region’s only trauma center--NGMC--and four EMS teams from Dawson County, Habersham County, Jackson County and White County, selected based on volume, response and transport times, and history of trauma patients who could benefit from prehospital blood. Due to cost and difficulty securing inventory of whole blood, the team opted to base the pilot project on prehospital plasma administration.

The Georgia team reached out to Peli BioThermal after they learned of STRAC’s success keeping whole blood in temperature range with the company’s products, and Peli BioThermal offered its Crēdo ProMed™ medical transport bag as a solution for temperature-controlled transport of plasma during the pilot program. The Crēdo ProMed is rugged and long-lasting, featuring a carry handle and adjustable shoulder strap for transportation in the most challenging situations. The weight and space-saving design is perfect for emergency vehicles strapped for space and also offers reliable temperature control for 72-96 hours.

Early outcomes of Georgia’s pilot program
The goal of Georgia’s pilot program is to show that paramedics can safely administer blood products in a prehospital setting. On May 2, 2020, less than a month after the pilot program began, Jackson County safely administered the first product through the pilot. In less than a year, all four EMS programs have safely administered prehospital plasma on 40 occasions.